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Yaksha


Yaksha Thailand Phrao Kaeo


  • Yaksha is a broad group of nature-spirits materials buried who are custodians of the natural reserves in the earth and tree roots. They appear in Buddhist, Jain and Hindu texts. The womanly form of the word is Yaksi or Yakshini.
  • In Buddhist, Jain and Hindu texts the Yaksha has a twin personality. A yaksha might be an innocent nature-fairy, related with mountains and woods, however there’s also a form of the Yaksha, that is a type of ghost that appears in the waylays and wilderness and eats travellers.
  • In poem of Kalidas, Meghaduta, the Yaksha storyteller is a romantic character, pining with love for his lost darling. On the contrary, in the educational Hindu discussion of the Yaksaprasna? "Questions of the Yaksha", it’s a tutelar spirit of a lake which challenges Yudhisthira. The Yakshas might have originally been the tutelar gods of villages and forests and were later considered as the custodian gods of the earth and the resources hidden below.
  • In Indian art, male yakshas are shown either as portly or as frightening soldiers. Female yakshas, yakshinis are shown as attractive young ladies with happy round faces and hips and complete breasts.
Yakshas in Buddhism
  • In Buddhist literature, the Yakshas are beneficent gods who protect the righteous, the guardians of the northern quarter and the attendants of Vaisravana. The term also refers to the 12 Heavenly Generals who protect the Medicine Buddha, Bhaisajyaguru.
  • The Yakkhas served as dedicated citizens with the House of Vijaya and the Yaksha ruler sat on equal height to the Sri Lankan leaders on carnival days.
Yakshas in Thailand
  • In Thai architecture and temple art Yakshas are an important element. They are common as protectors of the entrances in Buddhist temples all over the country. At many kiln complexes in northern Thailand, during the Sukhothai and Ayutthaya periods, ceramic statues of guardian Yakshas were produced. They are typically shown with a distinctive face, having big round bulging eyes and bulging teeth, and a green complexion. In the Buddhist literature of Thailand, Yakshas and their female counterparts are common such as in the Phra Aphai Mani and the Twelve Sisters. Yakshas are also present in Thai folklore as ogresses, giants, and ogres.
Yaksha and Yakshini in Jainism
  • Mainly idols of Tirthankaras and Arihants are worshipped by Jains. These idols have attained God-consciousness status and conquered the inner passions. Some Jains also believe that Yakshini and Yaksha take care of the Tirtha. Generally, they are in pair around the statues of Jinas as female (yakshini) and male (yaksha) guardian deities. Usually Yakshini is on the left-hand side of the Jina idol and Yaksha on the right-hand side. They are wandering through the cycles of deaths and births like the worldly souls. As time passed, people started worshiping these gods as well.
  • Some segments of Jains looked at Yakshinis and Yakshas for the immediate returns, and placed them in their temples. Some Yakshas bestowed wealth and fertility upon their devotees. For that reason Jains worship them and their idols had been placed in Jain temples. Jains offer them different things for freedom from disease, illness or fears.
  • Jainism provides very clear guidelines and foundations, and it’s up to every individual Jain to decide which idols to worship and which ones should just be acknowledged.



Yaksha Thailand Phrao Kaeo