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Hindu Gods and Goddesses of Bali

Indian Hindu Gods and Goddesses

  • Hinduism is considered to have initiated about 4,000 years back, around the Indus Valley situated in modern Pakistan. Hinduism was created as soon as the Aryan people, who originated from Central Asia, established townships inside the Indus Valley and merged the gods belonging to the Indus Valley area's native peoples in their own faith. Hinduism became a very polytheistic faith and a faith involving gods which could incorporate global dualities. For instance, a few of the gods were regarded as both female and male.
  • In the 1st century A.D., Hindus, all over India, started worshiping Vishnu, Shiva and Brahma as their 3 main gods. This development in Indian Hinduism at times involved gods being forgotten (they were no more adored). Other gods, which had earlier been adored as main gods, turned minor gods (gods which were adored as avatars of Vishnu, Shiva and Brahma). These days, a number of Indians still adore Vishnu, Shiva and Brahma, as their three main gods. Vishnu is adored as the ruler of the universe. As the ruler of the universe, Vishnu is also considered to support life. Shiva symbolises the god of paradoxes or dualities and Brahma is usually adored as the founder of the universe.
  • These days, in Indian Hinduism, a lot of people adore Brahman (not to be mistaken with Brahma) like a top god. Nevertheless, some scholars believe that Indian Hinduism hasn't developed to the stage that it's mainly a monotheistic faith. The reason of this is, in Indian Hinduism, lots of people even now adore many Gods and Goddesses like avatars of Brahman (which include Vishnu, Shiva and Brahma). Other scholars believe that Indian Hinduism has developed to the stage that it's mainly a monotheistic religion since most of India's Hindus, despite the fact they may adore more than one avatars of Brahman, eventually think that Brahman is the embodiment of all things in the world. Ultimately, it's possible that Indian Hinduism is a polytheistic and monotheistic religion.


Hindu Gods and Goddesses of Bali

  • These days, there are a number of commonalities between Balinese Hinduism and Indian Hinduism. For instance, in Indian Hinduism many people adore Brahman like a supreme god and in Balinese Hinduism many people adore Sanghyang Widhi Wasa like a supreme god. Sanghyang Widhi Wasa is just like Brahman, because Sanghyang Widhi Wasa is considered to include all global dualities. Additionally, Sanghyang Widhi Wasa is considered to have several avatars.
  • Most of the Hindu Gods and Goddesses of Bali were traditionally merged, in Balinese Hinduism, from Indian Hinduism. But, this merger process didn't always develop as a consequence of direct talk between the Indians and Balinese. A number of Balinese Hindu beliefs and practices were merged into Balinese Hinduism due to historical links which the Balinese had with the Javanese.
  • Traditionally, the Balinese seldom merged gods, into Balinese Hinduism, without changing their beliefs or the form which surrounded them. As a consequence, even though most of the Hindu Gods and Goddesses of Bali eventually descend from Indian Hinduism, these days, there are not many parallels between, for instance, Durga from Balinese Hinduism and Durga from Indian Hinduism. Durga, in Indian Hinduism, is considered to be among the female avatars from the God Shiva. The peculiar mindset of Shiva is additionally explained in the Indian Hindu faith that Shiva may take the shape of Kali or Paravati and Uma. Kali is usually portrayed, in Indian Hinduism, as a vengeful version of Shiva, a black body, a body with several hands gripping a bloody knife and the other hand holding a dismembered head, and a body which has a necklace of skulls. Dewi Durga is considered as the partner of Dewa Siwa in Balinese Hinduism. Sculptures of Dewa Durga are located at Hindu Pura Dalem sites of Bali.
  • In Balinese Hinduism, Rangda is considered to be among the avatars of Dewi Durga. Rangda is similar to Kali. But, while Kali, in Indian Hinduism, symbolises an extremely gloomy as well as revengeful aspect of Shiva, in Balinese Hinduism, Rangda symbolises a n extremely gloomy and revengeful aspect of Dewi Durga. Rangda is usually portrayed, in Balinese Hinduism, like a body with ugly physical qualities, an arch foe of Bali's favourite defender(s), a cannibal, bloodthirsty, a specialist in black magic, and as the Queen of Witches, (like 6 inch lengthy nails, hairy knuckles, and sagging bosoms). Rangda is considered to be a body which the Balinese traditionally got from the Javanese.
  • In Balinese Hinduism, Dewi Sri symbolises an extremely exceptional god. The reason of this is that Dewi Sri is considered to be exclusive to Bali. To put it differently, Dewi Sri is considered as a Balinese Hindu body which the Balinese traditionally didn't derived from a different tradition. Dewi Sri is the spouse of Wisnu, the nurturer and the defender of Bali's peddies, the Goddess of nourishment, and the Goddess of rice.